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Staying Security Smart

Today on the Edge of Innovation, we discuss how to be put safeguards on your computer to be safe from hacking.

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How To Check If Your Mac or Linux Machine Is Vulnerable to Shellshock

Shellshock, the newly discovered vulnerability that allows attackers to inject code into your machine, puts your Mac or Linux at a serious risk for malicious attacks. Here’s how to test if your machine is vulnerable. Shellshock uses a bash script to access your computer. From there, they can launch programs, enable features, and access files. The script only affects UNIX-based systems, so Linux and Mac are the only ones vulnerable. You can test your system by running this test command from Terminal: env x='() :;; echo vulnerable’ bash -c ‘echo hello’ If you’re not vulnerable, you’ll get this result: bash: warning: x: ignoring function definition attempt bash: error importing function definition for `x’ hello If you are vulnerable, you’ll get: vulnerable hello You can also…

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How To Check If Your Mac or Linux Machine Is Vulnerable to Shellshock

How to Operate Linux Spycams With Motion

When you want something a little simpler and more lightweight than Zoneminder for operating surveillance cameras, try Motion. Motion is a nice lightweight, yet capable application for operating surveillance cameras on Linux. It works with any Linux-supported video camera, including all V4L Webcams, many IP cameras, Axis cameras, and it controls pan and tilt functions. Motion records movies and snapshots in JPEG, PPM, and MPEG formats, and you can view these remotely in a Web browser thanks to Motion’s built-in HTTP server. It stores image files in a directory of your choosing, and it does not require a database, though it supports MySQL and PostgreSQL if you do want to use one. First let’s look at how to get an IP camera working with …

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How to Operate Linux Spycams With Motion

Improved default settings for Linux machines : @AlTobey Writes

I get asked about my default settings for Linux fairly frequently and was writing this in an email and decided to post it for broader use. If you have better recommendations, by all means please send me a pull request. The Edit button at the top of this page will get you there. There are a couple groups of settings below. Most of the settings below should end up in /etc/sysctl.conf or /etc/sysctl.d/filename.conf (depending on your distro). They can be applied immediately with sudo sysctl -p /etc/sysctl.d/filename.conf. I’ve applied most of these to hundreds of machines and never had an issue. That said, test in non-production first! I run the same settings across pretty much every …

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Improved default settings for Linux machines : @AlTobey Writes

Popcorn Time 0.3 Released With TV Series Support, New User Interface, Other Major New Features

Popcorn Time, an open source Netflix-style torrent streaming application for Linux, Windows and Mac which is quite popular these days, was updated to version 0.3 beta recently, bringing some major improvements such as TV series support, new user interface, user settings, bookmarks and more.The application allows users to stream movies (with subtitles) and TV series starting with the new 0.3 version, at no cost, and that may be illegal in your country so make sure you read the disclaimer before using Popcorn Time!The most interesting new features in Popcorn Time 0.3 beta:TV Series support; brand new interface; user settings: set language, enable/disable subtitles for a language by default (along with the subtitle size), change the TV Show API, etc.; bookmarks; more codecs are supported; new …

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Popcorn Time 0.3 Released With TV Series Support, New User Interface, Other Major New Features

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