Tagencryption

How an Attacker Could Crack Your Wireless Network Security

It’s important to secure your wireless network with WPA2 encryption and a strong passphrase. But what sorts of attacks are you actually securing it against? Here’s how attackers crack encrypted wireless networks. This isn’t a “how to crack a wireless network” guide. We’re not here to walk you through the process of compromising a network – we want you to understand how someone might compromise your network. Spying on an Unencrypted Network First, let’s start with the least secure network possible: An open network with no encryption. Anyone can obviously connect to the network and use your Internet connection without providing a passphrase. This could put you in legal danger if they do something illegal and it’s traced back to…

Original Article Can Be Found Here:

How an Attacker Could Crack Your Wireless Network Security

How to Anonymize Everything You Do Online

One year after the first revelations of Edward Snowden, cryptography has shifted from an obscure branch of computer science to an almost mainstream notion: It’s possible, user privacy groups and a growing industry of crypto-focused companies tell us, to encrypt everything from emails to IMs to a gif of a motorcycle jumping over a plane. But it’s also possible to go a step closer toward true privacy online. Mere encryption hides the content of messages, but not who’s communicating. Use cryptographic anonymity tools to hide your identity, on the other hand, and network eavesdroppers may not even know where to find your communications, let alone snoop on them….

Original Article Can Be Found Here:

How to Anonymize Everything You Do Online

Email encryption in transit

Many email providers don’t encrypt messages while they’re in transit. When you send or receive emails with one of these providers, these messages are as open to snoopers as a postcard in the mail. A growing number of email providers are working to change that, by encrypting messages sent to and from our services using Transport Layer Security (TLS). When an email is encrypted in transit with TLS, it makes it harder for others to read what you’re sending. The data below explains the current state of email encryption in transit. Generally speaking, use of encryption in transit increases over time, as more providers enable and maintain their support. Factors such as varying volumes of email may explain other fluctuations. Outbound Messages from Gmail …

Original Article Can be Found Here:

Email encryption in transit

Making end-to-end encryption easier to use

Tuesday, June 3, 2014 – posted by Stephan Somogyi, Product Manager, Security and Privacy

Your security online has always been a top priority for us, and we’re constantly working to make sure your data is safe. For example, Gmail supported HTTPS when it first launched and now always uses an encrypted connection when you check or send email in your browser. We warn people in Gmail and Chrome when we have reason to believe they’re being targeted by bad actors. We also alert you to malware and phishing when we find it.Today, we’re adding to that list the alpha version of a new tool. It’s called End-to-End and it’s a Chrome extension intended for users who need additional security beyond what …

Original Article Can be Found Here:

Making end-to-end encryption easier to use

TrueCrypt Is Back, But Should It Be?

Last week I wrote about the suspicious and abrupt announcement that TrueCrypt, a popular free open source encryption solution, was being abandoned and is considered “harmful and no longer secure”. In the article I covered the potential motives for this including the technical challenges with producing full disk encryption on modern hardware and operating systems. Whilst at this time there is little to add in terms of the potential motives for this sudden announcement a variety of interesting things have happened to the project since – including announcements that mean TrueCrypt may not be as dead as we thought. When the page at truecrypt.sourceforge.net was changed to a warning (and a set of migration instructions for Microsoft Bitlocker) the source code and old versions …

Original Article Can be Found Here:

TrueCrypt Is Back, But Should It Be?

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