Tagcolors

The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding

The psychology of color as it relates to persuasion is one of the most interesting–and most controversial–aspects of marketing. The reason: Most of today’s conversations on colors and persuasion consist of hunches, anecdotal evidence and advertisers blowing smoke about “colors and the mind.” To alleviate this trend and give proper treatment to a truly fascinating element of human behavior, today we’re going to cover a selection of the most reliable research on color theory and persuasion. Misconceptions around the Psychology of Color Why does color psychology invoke so much conversation … but is backed with so little factual data? As research shows, it’s likely because elements such as personal preference, experiences, upbringing, cultural differences, context, etc., often muddy the effect individual colors have on us…

Original Article Can Be Found Here:

The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding

Before Pantone, There was this Hand-Painted 17th Century Color Guide

A large and largely undocumented Dutch manuscript from 1692 was brought to the world’s attention last week after a historian published images of some of its stunning pages, many of which are filled with block after block of hand-painted colors. Some reports have been calling the manuscript the “original Pantone,” because “like the famous color catalog” the book documents hundreds of colors as they vary with different amounts of water. Titled Klaer lightende Spiegel der Verfkonst, it was hiding inside of a French library’s collection for about a century before being published online under a listing that roughly translates to A guide to colors for watercolor painting. According to medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel, the Leiden University researcher who brought attention to the book…

Original Article Can Be Found Here:

Before Pantone, there was this hand-painted 17th century color guide

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