TagChrome

Copy Codes from Websites Easily with SnappySnippet

As a web developer, we may occasionally find some inspiring elements on a website that makes you wonder how did they build that thing. Then, you’d think about getting a copy of that code. Chrome Devtools as well as Firebug of Firefox has actually shipped with the feature that makes it easy for us to copy HTML and CSS off a website. However, these tools work to copy only HTML or CSS; you can’t use these tools to copy the CSS related to the HTML element you selected. For example, let’s say you are selecting an HTML element containing a couple of child elements, as follows…

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Copy Codes from Websites Easily with SnappySnippet

Making end-to-end encryption easier to use

Tuesday, June 3, 2014 – posted by Stephan Somogyi, Product Manager, Security and Privacy

Your security online has always been a top priority for us, and we’re constantly working to make sure your data is safe. For example, Gmail supported HTTPS when it first launched and now always uses an encrypted connection when you check or send email in your browser. We warn people in Gmail and Chrome when we have reason to believe they’re being targeted by bad actors. We also alert you to malware and phishing when we find it.Today, we’re adding to that list the alpha version of a new tool. It’s called End-to-End and it’s a Chrome extension intended for users who need additional security beyond what …

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Making end-to-end encryption easier to use

Google Cuts off Chrome Extensions That Don’t Come From the Web Store

A while back Google said that it would stop letting Windows users install Chrome extensions that didn’t come directly from the Web Store. The company ended up delaying the plan, but there is no more fighting it. Today users of the stable channel of Chrome on Windows will no longer be able to install extensions from outside the Web Store. That won’t impact too many users thankfully, but it could make it difficult for those that like to run experimental add-ons. If you’ve already sideloaded extensions from outside of the Chrome Web Store, those will be disabled starting today; if you want to re-enable them, you’ll have to make the switch to the dev channel of the browser. The idea is to protect users from…

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Google cuts off Chrome extensions that don’t come from the Web Store

Access your PCs from afar with Google’s Free, Simple Chrome Remote Desktop Software

Thanks to cloud services like Dropbox, Google Drive, and OneDrive it’s pretty easy to access your files from anywhere. Even so, there are still times when you need remote access to your desktop while on the go. That’s where Google’s handy Remote Desktop browser extension for Chrome comes in. With Chrome Remote Desktop installed and enabled, you can access your PC from any other PC that has Chrome installed, or from your Android device. (An iOS app is planned for later this year.) Chrome Remote Desktop is both free and dead-simple to use, unlike most other remote desktop options. Here’s how use it. Preparing your remote desktop For this tool to work, you’ll need to have the Chrome browser and Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop extension…

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Access your PCs from afar with Google’s free, simple Chrome Remote Desktop software

Chrome’s experiment of hiding the URL is awful

04 May 2014 As was pointed out last week, Google Chrome has been experimenting with hiding the URL from the browser. Recently, Jake Archibald, a member of the Chrome team, wrote a piece talking about how this change is great for security. I don’t think it is great for anything. This is what the current implementation looks like: As you see it is hiding the complete URLs here in favor of showing just the domain name. URLs are the building blocks of the web. Every website contains hundreds or thousands of URLs. Every page has a unique URL so that you can identify it and share it with other people. There is a reason they have always been front and center in all web browsers. Call me cynical, but…

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Chrome’s experiment of hiding the URL is awful

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